Coverart for item
The Resource Color : a course in mastering the art of mixing colors, Betty Edwards

Color : a course in mastering the art of mixing colors, Betty Edwards

Label
Color : a course in mastering the art of mixing colors
Title
Color
Title remainder
a course in mastering the art of mixing colors
Statement of responsibility
Betty Edwards
Title variation
Course in mastering the art of mixing colors
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Additional physical form
Also issued online.
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1926-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Edwards, Betty
Dewey number
752
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
ND1488
LC item number
.E35 2004
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Color in art
Label
Color : a course in mastering the art of mixing colors, Betty Edwards
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-198) and index
Contents
Drawing, color, painting, and brain processes -- Seeing colors as values -- Why values are important -- The role of language in color and painting -- The constancies: seeing and believing -- Seeing how light changes colors -- Seeing how colors affect each other -- Understanding and applying color theory -- Theories about color -- Applying color theory in art -- Learning the vocabulary of color -- The three primary colors -- The three secondary colors -- The six tertiary colors -- Analogous colors -- Complementary colors -- Naming colors: the L-mode role in mixing colors -- The three attributes of color: hue, value, and intensity -- From naming to mixing -- Moving from theory to practice -- Buying and using paints and brushes -- Buying supplies -- Beginning to paint -- Mixing a color -- Exercise 1. Subjective color -- Cleaning up -- Using the color wheel to understand hue -- Exercise 2. Making a color wheel template -- Exercise 3. Painting the color wheel -- Exercise 4. Practice in identifying hues -- Mixing colors -- Creating colors: how four pigments can become hundreds of colors -- Using the color wheel to understand value -- Value -- Exercise 5. Shades of gray: constructing a value wheel/hue scanner -- How to use your value wheel/hue scanner -- How to lighten and darken colors -- Exercise 6. Two color value wheels: from white to a pure hue, from a pure hue to black -- Other ways of lightening and darkening colors -- Another way to darken a color -- Summing up -- Using the color wheel to understand intensity -- Exercise 7. The power of the primaries to cancel color -- Exercise 8. Creating an intensity wheel: from a pure hue to no color and back again -- Exercise 9. Practice in naming hue, value, and intensity -- Others ways to dull colors -- What constitutes harmony in color? -- The aesthetic response to harmonious color -- The phenomenon of after-images -- After-images and the attributes of color -- Albert Munsell's theory of harmony based on balancing color -- A definition of balanced color -- Creating harmony in color -- Exercise 10. Transforming color using complements and the three attributes: hue, value, and intensity -- Seeing the effects of light, color constancy, and simultaneous contrast -- The next step: seeing how light affects the colors of three-dimensional shapes -- Why it is difficult to see the effects of light -- How to accurately perceive colors affected by light -- Three different methods of scanning a hue -- The next step: estimating the intensity level -- The three-part process of painting -- Exercise 11. Painting a still life -- Seeing the beauty of color in nature -- Color harmony in flowers -- Floral painting in art -- Colors in nature differ from colors of human-made objects -- Exercise 12. Painting a floral still life -- Nature as a teacher of color -- The meaning and symbolism of colors -- Attaching names to colors -- Using colors to express menaing -- Exercise 13. The color of human emotions -- Your preferred colors and what they mean -- Knowing your color preferences and your color expressions -- The symbolic meanings of colors -- Practicing your understanding of the meaning of color -- Using your color knowledge
Control code
ocm53462201
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xvii, 206 p.
Isbn
9781585422197
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2003067215
Other physical details
ill. (chiefly col.)
System control number
(OCoLC)53462201
Label
Color : a course in mastering the art of mixing colors, Betty Edwards
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-198) and index
Contents
Drawing, color, painting, and brain processes -- Seeing colors as values -- Why values are important -- The role of language in color and painting -- The constancies: seeing and believing -- Seeing how light changes colors -- Seeing how colors affect each other -- Understanding and applying color theory -- Theories about color -- Applying color theory in art -- Learning the vocabulary of color -- The three primary colors -- The three secondary colors -- The six tertiary colors -- Analogous colors -- Complementary colors -- Naming colors: the L-mode role in mixing colors -- The three attributes of color: hue, value, and intensity -- From naming to mixing -- Moving from theory to practice -- Buying and using paints and brushes -- Buying supplies -- Beginning to paint -- Mixing a color -- Exercise 1. Subjective color -- Cleaning up -- Using the color wheel to understand hue -- Exercise 2. Making a color wheel template -- Exercise 3. Painting the color wheel -- Exercise 4. Practice in identifying hues -- Mixing colors -- Creating colors: how four pigments can become hundreds of colors -- Using the color wheel to understand value -- Value -- Exercise 5. Shades of gray: constructing a value wheel/hue scanner -- How to use your value wheel/hue scanner -- How to lighten and darken colors -- Exercise 6. Two color value wheels: from white to a pure hue, from a pure hue to black -- Other ways of lightening and darkening colors -- Another way to darken a color -- Summing up -- Using the color wheel to understand intensity -- Exercise 7. The power of the primaries to cancel color -- Exercise 8. Creating an intensity wheel: from a pure hue to no color and back again -- Exercise 9. Practice in naming hue, value, and intensity -- Others ways to dull colors -- What constitutes harmony in color? -- The aesthetic response to harmonious color -- The phenomenon of after-images -- After-images and the attributes of color -- Albert Munsell's theory of harmony based on balancing color -- A definition of balanced color -- Creating harmony in color -- Exercise 10. Transforming color using complements and the three attributes: hue, value, and intensity -- Seeing the effects of light, color constancy, and simultaneous contrast -- The next step: seeing how light affects the colors of three-dimensional shapes -- Why it is difficult to see the effects of light -- How to accurately perceive colors affected by light -- Three different methods of scanning a hue -- The next step: estimating the intensity level -- The three-part process of painting -- Exercise 11. Painting a still life -- Seeing the beauty of color in nature -- Color harmony in flowers -- Floral painting in art -- Colors in nature differ from colors of human-made objects -- Exercise 12. Painting a floral still life -- Nature as a teacher of color -- The meaning and symbolism of colors -- Attaching names to colors -- Using colors to express menaing -- Exercise 13. The color of human emotions -- Your preferred colors and what they mean -- Knowing your color preferences and your color expressions -- The symbolic meanings of colors -- Practicing your understanding of the meaning of color -- Using your color knowledge
Control code
ocm53462201
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xvii, 206 p.
Isbn
9781585422197
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2003067215
Other physical details
ill. (chiefly col.)
System control number
(OCoLC)53462201

Library Locations

    • Colonial Heights LibraryBorrow it
      4799 Stockton Blvd, Sacramento, CA, 95820, US
      38.532415 -121.445594
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